My American Revolution

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My American Revolution My American Revolution is a book that is (1) about the history of the American Revolution in the place where it kicked off that is not Massachusetts; and (2) about history and New York and how we think about both or either every year, after each of the earth's revolutions around the sun. The New Yorker called the book "historically fascinating and deeply personal." The Boston Globe called it "strange and beautiful." The Minneapolis Star-Tribune called the author "a true poet of living history history as well as a consumate subversive, showing us how the recoveries of the abandoned past are essential for liberty and justice."
thewindthatblows:

On Sunday, the Times writes about an historian who believes that Third Avenue and 8th Street are the potential site of the Maryland regiment. I recently investigated a site on that block that was dug up—and I called various officials and archeologists, attempting to encourage an archeological dig. Above is the site. I write extensively about the history of the site in My American Revolution, and people have been looking around there for years. I write as well about the Brooklyn historian who attempted to win a federal designation for the site and failed. His name was Jamie Kelly, a one-time subway tunnel foreman who, while working on a tunnel gang, discovered a Dutch ship, the Tijger. When John Gallagher, the author of the Battle of Brooklyn, was alive, I talked to him about using sonar in the neighborhood to scan for the graves. Two summers ago, I talked to an archeologist at Hunter College who suggested the burial site was closer to the Old Stone House.

thewindthatblows:

On Sunday, the Times writes about an historian who believes that Third Avenue and 8th Street are the potential site of the Maryland regiment. I recently investigated a site on that block that was dug up—and I called various officials and archeologists, attempting to encourage an archeological dig. Above is the site. I write extensively about the history of the site in My American Revolution, and people have been looking around there for years. I write as well about the Brooklyn historian who attempted to win a federal designation for the site and failed. His name was Jamie Kelly, a one-time subway tunnel foreman who, while working on a tunnel gang, discovered a Dutch ship, the Tijger. When John Gallagher, the author of the Battle of Brooklyn, was alive, I talked to him about using sonar in the neighborhood to scan for the graves. Two summers ago, I talked to an archeologist at Hunter College who suggested the burial site was closer to the Old Stone House.

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